Brock Turner and porn users share a culture of sexual entitlement

Brock Turner

Rape culture is porn culture in 2016 — the two are indistinguishable. Since Hustler famously turned Cheryl Araujo’s 1983 gang rape, on a pool table in Massachusetts as other men watched, into porn, rape culture and porn culture have been merged, quite literally, by pornographers. We could place bets on how many days it will be until porn users are offered pornography themed on the Stanford rape case.

Consequently, it’s not unfathomable that the average porn user and Stanford rapist Brock Turner share similarities in how they have learned to pursue sexual gratification.

People who masturbate with porn largely think they’re better people than the Stanford rapist, but are they? Let’s examine the possibilities of anti-rape porn users sexually consuming the products of prostitution with integrity.

Both the Stanford rapist and men who use porn believe some women are there for the sexual taking, no questions asked. Like Turner, porn users stumble across drugged up, barely conscious-to-unconscious women and assume consent. Testimony from the porn industry confirms intoxication is ubiquitous during production, and even Hollywood actresses like Jennifer Lawrence often admit to using alcohol or pharmaceuticals to get through simulated sex scenes.

Neither Turner nor porn consumers could possibly get sober consent from the bodies they masturbated themselves with, but that hasn’t stopped them.

Porn users and Turner are similarly confident no one will know precisely how they’re getting off, and if details are made public they’re embarrassed by the loss of privacy and shamed by people’s judgments. Liberal feminists who defend pornography as freedom of speech often divulge intimate details of their sex lives and pubic hair grooming while adamantly refusing to name the porn they personally consume. Husbands notoriously keep their porn secret from their sex partners, and divorces commonly result after wives find out what their husbands have been doing when they thought no one would see.

Brock’s victim wrote that, while in the hospital, she “had a Nikon pointed right into my spread legs.” Do porn users truly understand what she meant by including that detail? Perhaps some readers thought it “whorephobic” of her to imply there’s something inherently violating about having your genitals photographed.

News reports have revealed Turner took at least one photo of the victim’s breasts after the assault that he shared with friends via text, illustrating again the seamless fusion of rape culture and porn culture. Porn consumers have no way of knowing if the images they’ve seen were captured during rape.

The victim’s letter said no one wants to have sex behind a dumpster, not even with their boyfriend, but why should porn users believe that? There’s plenty of porn showing women fucked behind dumpsters, bent over dumpsters, inside dumpsters. The term “cum dumpster” is so common in porn that Turner himself has almost surely encountered it in his pornographic viewings, along with “jizz guzzler,” “cum bucket,” and “cocksocket.” Porn users don’t ask themselves if they would accept having sex in the gross places the women they stumble across on the internet are presented as accepting.

Turner said he didn’t know the name of the woman on the ground beneath him. How many porn users do you think know Jenna Jameson’s real last name is Massoli? Most porn users couldn’t even tell you the fake name of the last porn actress they masturbated themselves to while watching her be prostituted. The voyeuristic consumption of anonymous women’s sex is considered completely normal.

Pine needles up the vagina is downright wholesome compared to the things men have shoved inside women to make porn (multiple penises, animal penises, feces, etc), but the same common-sense-conscience porn users admonish Turner for not employing doesn’t get applied to porn.

Like Turner’s victim, women in porn will retain no memories of specific porn users getting themselves off with their bodies. Many prostituted women who have had their rapes filmed said it affects their lives to know their suffering is remembered and continually masturbated to by men who have seen their naked bodies and what was inflicted upon them in the name of “sex.”

The victim’s statement includes a reference to popular porn series Girls Gone Wild: “To listen to your attorney attempt to paint a picture of me, the face of girls gone wild [sic], as if somehow that would make it so that I had this coming for me.”

Through all my years of anti-prostitution activism, the idea that prostituted women are wild girls who willingly put themselves into what everyone knows is a dangerous situation remains the most common excuse porn users make. Turner and porn users both insist their belief that, “She wanted it” makes the “it” she got the “it” she should have expected to get and, therefore, her fault.

Everyone wants to believe they would be like the Swedish bicyclists in this story, but porn users haven’t shown a willingness to intervene in what they’ve seen so far. Before those Swedes stopped and acted, there were likely a few people who walked along the path, saw what was happening, and found excuses not to intervene. Those of us who choose to interfere with pornographic sexual exploitation no longer watch porn.

If there are any porn users reading this, here’s an experiment for your next pornsturbation session: Ask yourself the question you expected Brock Turner to ask: “How can I know for sure if this woman has genuinely consented to this sexual activity?” If you don’t know more about the women in front of you than the Stanford rapist knew about the woman in front of him, consider how porn culture might be influencing your ostensible anti-rape culture ethics.

Samantha Berg is a radical feminist journalist, activist, and event organizer. Her articles have been published in progressive media for over a decade, and in recent years she has organized anti-prostitution political events in the United States and Canada. Find more of her work at JohnStompers.com and Genderberg.com.

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  • Tobysgirl

    We do not talk about male entitlement in our culture or, I imagine, any other culture. Almost on a daily basis — in my rural, low-population state — we have child molestation and sexual assault by males on the television news. But it is never discussed in any meaningful way, and I have seen no liberal feminists bring it up for discussion. Everything in our society has become a personal tragedy — cancer, spousal battering, rape, unemployment, disability — which speaks to the absolute triumph of neoliberalism.

  • lesbear

    The idea that women in porn “want” whatever is being done to them is phenomenally toxic, not just for male porn viewers but for female porn viewers as well. If you’re a straight man, it’s probably easy to relate to the male “actors” and imagine yourself in their position – especially because you’re usually not the one being slapped around or getting random objects shoved into your body.

    But if you’re a woman, who do you relate to when you’re watching something that looks like (and very well may be) rape? The woman? Well, that obviously means that you get off on rape, so that renders you un-rapeable since you will always want sex whether it’s consensual or not. (/sarcasm) If you can’t relate to the woman because you don’t want to be raped or beaten or abused in other ways, are you supposed to relate to the man inflicting all of this her?

    I was exposed to porn at an early age and it became normalized to me very, very quickly. I could write an entire series of books detailing the severe negative impacts it has had on me; I’m not even sure whether it’s possible for me to regain a “normal” or “healthy” sexuality since I never had one to begin with. My sexuality started with porn and I’m still struggling to break the addiction to it. Fortunately, every time I read an excellent piece like this, I’m reminded why I need to keep fighting to get this poison out of my system.

    • therealcie

      A similar thing happened to me. I found my father’s porn magazines at age 12. When he found me looking at them, he tried to awkwardly explain that men “need” this sort of thing. I couldn’t understand why my mother, the woman to whom he was married (and who he never all-out cheated on, to his credit) wasn’t enough for him. I later learned that she didn’t understand either and hated my father’s “need” for these magazines.
      I was raised to be a “little lady,” which lead me to believe that I didn’t have the right to say no. Most of my teenage sexual experiences were coercive and damaging. I felt like a “slut,” but I also felt like I didn’t have the right to say no.
      Most of my relationships as an adult were emotionally abusive and sometimes also physically abusive.
      I went for a period of 16 years of complete physical celibacy, although there were a couple of emotional relationships. Neither was good. One was with a man who was separated from his wife and kept stringing me along until I learned that what I suspected was true: he enjoyed seeing me but had no intention of actually leaving his wife. Thankfully, we never got together physically. The other was with an old boyfriend who screwed my life up years ago and proceeded to screw it up again. Thankfully, I didn’t get together with him physically either.
      Along the way I also had a compulsion to masturbate to humiliating porn, and I hated myself for it, particularly considering that I had been the victim of sexual assault more than once, the most damaging occasion being when I woke up with an ex boyfriend that I’d brought back to my apartment with me to stop him from starting a fight with a co-worker on top of me. I had gone to bed fully clothed, and woke up with my clothes off and him having sex with me. I was too drunk to be able to fight him off. I remember shouting (or trying to shout) “stop it!” several times before he orgasmed and said “well, now we’re back together.”
      I thought I’d never be able to get rid of the porn compulsion and I thought it would destroy any ability to have a normal relationship. I got together with a very gentle man a year and a half ago, and when I tearfully explained the problem to him, he didn’t shame me. He also didn’t capitalize on it for his own pleasure as my ex husband did. He helped me overcome it. I couldn’t be more grateful to this very rare man for all the wonderful things he’s done. Sadly, he is quite ill at this time.
      The point of this long comment being, pornography is super destructive. It teaches men that treating women like garbage is “sexy,” and it teaches women that self-hate is “sexy.”

    • Kendall Turtle

      I too was exposed to pornography at a very early age (I was 11 and it was a pop up on my browser) growing up in a super religious home we didn’t have much room for discussing sexuality so I never brought it up to my parents and would view it in secret. It wasn’t until I became pregnant last year that I really started questioning porn and the things I would view, I personally didn’t want the things in my fantasies to be done to me, I wanted to watch men do them to other women. I too dehumanized other women and liked to see them be hurt just like men do, but I’ve stopped viewing pornography since then (although I won’t lie, it wasn’t an instant thing, orgasms are a powerful conditioning tool) and feel much more empathy towards women now.

      It was because of this site that I stopped partaking in the abuse of women, and realized our full humanity.

      • lesbear

        I know exactly what you mean by learning to dehumanize other women. I was definitely guilty of that, too, especially when I was younger (right around the time I started watching porn, actually) and I was being bullied by the super girly-girl/cheerleader/prom queen type girls in my class, who dressed and acted an awful lot like the women I saw in porn. I was already a tomboy by then, but the combination of bullying and porn exposure really cemented my disgust towards femininity and hyper-feminine women, and it took me a LONG time to get past that.

    • Wren

      Porn is propaganda, both for the victim and the victimizer. How else could half the world’s population be conquered?

  • Rwingcannon

    This is all the more reason to ban alcohol. I wonder how many more rapists would get sentenced in a world without alcohol. Saudi Arabia has banned Alcohol, others can to!

    • Reffael Fishzon

      nope nope nope nope nooooope

    • Andrew Cole

      Blame alcohol. Blame the victim. Blame everyone and everything but the RAPIST.

      Great reasoning. /sarcasm

    • Misanthropia

      Do you hear yourself talk? Saudi Arabia has banned alcohol but it still has some of the worst conditions for women to live in the middle east. Alcohol has nothing to do with this.

  • Rwingcannon

    He may have zilch interest in porn, some people are just jerks. & it’s also prejudiced to say “Before those Swedes stopped and acted, there were likely a few people who walked along the path, saw what was happening, and found excuses not to intervene.”. You weren’t there & don’t know how many people just happened to walk by a dumpster. If you’re going to complain about prejudice towards women, you should not exhibit prejudice yourself.

    • Meghan Murphy

      As IF he wasn’t a porn consumer. I’ll bet you a million dollars.

      • Sara Marie

        yeah, wonder if @Rwingcannon:disqus would be willing to place a bet on that with real money. Rwingcannon might want to consider that TUrner *made* and shared porn of the victim on his cell phone. But he wasn’t a porn user. Right.

    • Cassandra

      Who is she being “prejudiced” *against*?

  • Meghan Murphy

    You need to read words more carefully.

  • Meghan Murphy

    Pointing out reality is not prejudice.

    • Rwingcannon

      & if you want a more specific example, look at the guy that shot up that church full of black people relatively recently. He said he became a racist because he googled “Black on white crime” & saw the crime rate of black people compared to white,s & made the prejudiced assertion that all black people are alike. He believed he was acting in reasonably defendable self-defense. That doesn’t justify his prejudice and discrimination.

      • Meghan Murphy

        What are you even arguing?? What is the ‘prejudice’ you are imagining here? That we assume Turner watched porn?? That is not in any way the same as racism. Good god.

  • Cassandra

    There’s this thing called “male privilege.” If you can get past your knee-jerk defensiveness and yes, entitlement, you could start by reading up on what male privilege and entitlement are and how that relates to who’s at the top of the power pyramid worldwide. It is not an even playing field. You sound young so I’m giving you the benefit of the doubt in regard to your “gotcha!” comment that we’ve heard 4355092457 times.

    And yes, the vast majority of men are inherently hostile to women’s rights, even when they think they’re not. Again related to who has social power.

  • lesbear

    I’ve heard loads of great things about karezza! I’m not dating anyone at the moment but I plan to bring this up if I find myself in a relationship again. I’m not sure there’s anything I can do with it by myself, but please do correct me if I’m wrong about that.

  • Meghan Murphy

    Pointing out how masculinity functions, how systems of oppression work, and that male violence is a real thing does not equate to “so and so group of people are all alike.” Male violence exists as part of patriarchy and is connected to masculinity (i.e. gendered socialization). The reason we are feminists is not because we think men are innately “bad,” but because we believe society and culture and people are capable of change. When make make a CHOICE to rape, though, that is still a choice. How the fuck are you equating people naming rape as rape and rape as connected to larger systems of oppression and things like porn to racism, A FORM A SYSTEMIC OPPRESSION, is beyond me.

  • Meghan Murphy

    lol

  • Meghan Murphy

    That’s not prejudice. That’s just being realistic.

  • Meghan Murphy

    No it isn’t and of course he did.

  • Meghan Murphy

    “unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, especially of a hostile nature, regarding an ethnic, racial, social, or religious group.”

    It is absolutely reasonable to assume Turner, like most (if not all) other rapey bro-y college watched porn. I mean, how the fuck could he have avoided if, even if he wanted to? (And it’s reasonable to assume he sought it out, in any case.) I mean, do you know anyone who’s never seen porn?

  • Meghan Murphy

    “unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, especially of a hostile nature, regarding an ethnic, racial, social, or religious group.”

    “an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason.”

    We are assuming he used porn based on reasonable assumption and knowledge of Turner’s behaviour and the behaviour of men of his age and ilk. Stop wasting everyone’s time with this stupidity.

    • Rwingcannon

      By that logic, the KKK have reasonable assumption that all black people are criminals. Is that a stupid statement?

      • Wren

        Yes that is a stupid statement. Everything you say is a stupid statement. Can you go be stupid somewhere else, please?

  • Christina_Puck

    Excellent. The scariest thing to me is that Brock is not a “monster”, but that he is actually a very ordinary typical male with a VERY common mindset.

    • Sally Hansen

      Personally, I think most men are monsters…. like the vast majority. That’s why this behavior is so “typical”. They weren’t born that way, but they sure as hell were MADE that way.

  • marv

    You are sexist. So am I. Whether a man’s personal behaviour exhibits sexism (which it usually does as you are exemplifying) or not we live in is a system of oppression of women. Men have sexist privilege by dwelling in these circumstances. Blurting “not all men” is like moaning “not all capitalists”. You and I are part of the oppressor class so we are part of the problem. Denial changes nothing including swaggering.

  • Si Llage

    From today’s LA Times:

    “Japanese police begin crackdown on coerced sex in the porn industry”

    http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-japan-porn-20160613-snap-story.html

    In March, the Tokyo-based advocacy group Human Rights Now issued a report (link
    in Japanese) charging that Japan’s pornography industry, which is reputed to take in $4.4 billion annually, violated the human rights of women and girls by blackmailing them and coercing them into work they didn’t want to do.

    Shihoko Fujiwara, the founder of another group, the nonprofit Lighthouse: Center for Human Trafficking Victims, said that in the last year her group had received more than 100 complaints regarding forced participation in porn — and that the industry uses tactics similar to human traffickers.

    “Victims are talked into signing a fashion-modeling contract,” Fujiwara said. “When they turn up on set they are informed that it is a porn shoot. They beg to quit or go home but are threatened to be charged millions of yen for penalties for contract violations and often end up giving in. The results are life devastating.”

  • Rwingcannon

    I’m not a men’s rights activist. If I were, I’d say things like “legalize raping women” or “women should be oppressed”.

    • Meghan Murphy

      Naw. MRAs are much more manipulative than that. They like to pretend they are the true feminists!

  • Rwingcannon

    By that logic, the person who attacked that African American Church in Charleston & the KKK hase evidence-based conclusions.

  • Wren

    Of course. They all know this and that’s the point. Men have a much better understanding of what they are doing by consuming porn than most women realize or understand themselves, but they have these excuses that they know women WANT to believe.

  • lk

    “The leading book on ADHD advocates porn use for men with ADHD. Psychotherapy Networker, an online magazine advocates for pornography.”

    Nooooo, why?!

    I have high expectations of mental health practitioners and tbh, I just expect better from them; more from them.

    I feel like the mental health field is being pressured to support whatever is popular, even at the expense of helping patients acknowledge reality and become as psychologically healthy as possible (eg, therapist support that of the idea that someone who is transgender was born in the wrong body).

  • Meghan Murphy

    Can you please stop leaving 20 comments at a time? It just means I have to go through and delete half of them. It would be more productive if you just made your argument and left it at that. Thanks.

  • Meghan Murphy

    Blah blah blah bye.

  • Meghan Murphy

    lol

  • therealcie

    Out one side of your mouth, you praise Saudi Arabia for banning alcohol. Out the other side of your mouth, you imply that Middle Eastern men feel entitled to rape.
    MRA’s and trolls always talk out both sides of their mouths.
    I have just stereotyped MRA’s and trolls. Strangely, I don’t feel the least bit sorry.

  • therealcie

    Now now, be nice. You might hurt the wittle MRA’s fee-fees.

  • Mar Iguana

    “Women have very little idea of how much men hate them.” Germaine Greer

  • asialita

    If you really believe women should not be oppressed (I’m assuming you meant to write “should”), then maybe you should start actually *listening* to women about how to end that oppression instead of gaslighting us when we describe our experiences (telling us that our experiences never happened, it’s all in our heads, we’re “overreacting”, or that we’re outright lying about it) and dictating to women how we should think and feel about the way we are treated and the things that are done to us. That in itself is very oppressive behavior. Listen to us, try to practice empathizing with us by putting yourself in the situations we describe, don’t tell us we’re making shit up or that we’re crazy, don’t tell us how you think we should feel and respond to the situations, stop telling us that our observations made over the span of our life times are nonsense.

    Instead of criticizing us for how we feel and respond to men’s behavior, get angry at your fellow men who behave in awful ways and call *them* out on it. It brings me and other women no pleasure at all to state the facts about violent and misogynistic male behavior. I wish more than anything that this wasn’t an issue. I wish more than anything that the relations between men and women were different. I wish more than anything that the statistics and evidence weren’t true. But wishing hasn’t made anything happen yet. Men need to help in turning this around instead of denying what is pretty clear in front of everyone’s faces. Stop the ridiculous denials and help make the world a better place for everyone.

  • Truth Teller

    Rather than focusing on trying to reform males, which women have been trying to do for time in memorial, to no avail. It is much more productive to work on ourselves, and decondition from the learnt behaviours, and desires that we have adopted as our own. We can not change other people only ourselves. This is the mistake many women make, thinking they can change males. Men do not want to change, why would they? They are satisfied with being on top of the hierarchy and they like to get off on sadism. What motivation do they possibly have for giving that up? It is like asking a head of a company to take a 75% pay cut so all other employees can have equal pay, it is not going to happen.

    Of course porn needs to be eradicated, because it harms the women who are in it. Not because it would make males better partners. That can not happen, it is similar to a slave saying; a slave owner could be a decent partner to a slave, if only they did not own slaves or beat slaves etc. It negates the power dynamics of such a relationship, both social and psychological. We need to examine why a member of the oppressed caste would desire to have a relationship with the oppressor caste in the first place. These are not innate desires, in contrast to males propaganda that they are. They may feel innate to many women, but so do many likes and dislikes that are learnt.

    Women need to realize that their very attraction to males is only based on internalised misogyny and conditioned masochism. It is not natural, on the contrary, it is very unnatural, the argument about female animals being het is blatant male lies. Female animals often only pair with males to gain shelter, protection from predators or for food (due to being denied it from males who are usually larger). These are truths men do not want women to know about, so they invented ‘romance’. I call this; ‘gloss’, it is used to disguise or gloss over the truth about heterosexuality. Now the gloss is wearing thin and we can see the true motives of males; which is to use women as sexual objects or as birthing devices for their heirs. Porn, surrogacy and the push to legalize prostitution should have made that crystal clear by now. If women do not decondition themselves out of their learnt desire for a male partner, ‘nice’ or not, we will always be oppressed. No woman can truly be for women if she is still hoping to find a ‘nice’ male partner. As the desire for a male partner comes from internalized misogyny and conditioned masochism. If a woman truly respected herself and other women, and didn’t value males above females; she would reject males and no longer have any desire to partner with them.

    Only women ourselves have the power to break the chains of our oppression, males will not stop oppressing by choice. They use the fact that women are still willing to date them as proof that women like male supremacy, are innately masochistic and inferior. Just as many women have to decondition themselves from watching porn, many also have to decondition themselves from desiring a relationship with their oppressor. Both impulses are equally manufactured and unhealthy, regardless of how ‘nice’ the individual male may seem (or indeed be). It is not about individuals, but about structural power dynamics. Every woman has to make a choice; fight for women’s liberation, which means changing certain things about ourselves that do not serve us, or in fact harm us. Or accept the world as it is, and our conditioned behaviours, impulses etc and carry on being oppressed. This may seem harsh, but the truth often is harsh.

    • Mar Iguana

      This is just about the best comment I’ve ever read, Truth Teller.

      Earth + fork = Done

    • lk

      There is so much truth in your comment, but your last line about every woman having to make a choice is really sticking with me. Making these choices to change ourselves, reject things that harm us (even if they give us some fleeting pleasure) is not necessarily easy, but worth it to improve women’s lives.

  • Meghan Murphy

    How can there be no correlation between rape and porn when rape is literally made into porn?

  • asialita

    “Aslialita I have never denied what women go through or that why are
    oppressed. Nor have I said “it’s all in your head”. I simply believe
    that saying that men are all alike or that they should all be subject to
    segregated buses & train cars & curfews because “They obviously
    cannot be trusted” is morally wrong because “they obviously cannot be
    trusted” is the same reason racist oppressors give for their actions. Is
    that what you call “oppressive”?”

    Not sure where the whole trains and buses and curfews thing came from, I haven’t followed this entire thread and the other related ones. But again, women do not want these things because we just enjoy tormenting men for absolutely no reason. It’s because we’re having to deal with harassment, stalking, and unwanted touching almost on a daily basis. Not all men touch, harass, stalk, threaten, etc. women, but all women (or damn near all of them) have experienced some or all of these things or worse. We have to take measures to protect ourselves since men aren’t fixing the problem any time soon. The “good guys” are all in too much denial about the seriousness of the problem and too afraid to call their fellow men out on their bad behavior. Until men stop harassing and touching us on public transport, then many women are going to appreciate segregated buses and train cars. I don’t savor the idea of being separated from my male friends and relatives in those situations, but if it will keep women safe, then I have no problem with women deciding it is necessary.

    Not all men, but enough men to where we have to be super careful and take measures to protect ourselves. And I’m sure that while you’re sitting there telling women that we are total assholes for assuming “all men” are rapists and harassers, you’re probably talking out of the other side of your mouth and telling us we need to carry guns, not drink too much, don’t go out late at night, don’t go to clubs alone, carry pepper spray, etc. which is pretty much saying there are an awful lot of men out there that can’t be trusted.

    So again, you are dictating to women how we should feel and respond to the things that are done to us instead of directing your frustrations to your fellow men whom you refuse to call out when they exhibit shitty attitudes and behavior towards us. When you let it slide, or pretend to laugh along with them, or sit there silently, etc. then you are just enabling that behavior, giving your approval. I know it’s not always safe or a good time to show your disapproval to other men, but men have to do it when they can to change the culture.

    As for the curfews thing, I think you’re probably referring to women countering the argument that women need to be put under a curfew to keep us safe. The point was that no, women should not be punished for the things men do to us by curtailing our freedom. If so many of your fellow men just can’t seem to resist raping, harassing, and murdering us, then men should be the ones under a curfew. I don’t think most women really want a curfew for men, it was just pointing out the absurdity of punishing all women for what men do, and the truth of the matter is that there are enough men making our lives difficult that it is hard to tell who are the good guys, bad guys, enablers, etc.

    Women’s safety is more than men’s hurt feelings. You’re actually arguing that women being afraid of men is oppressive to men? How about men making women afraid to be around them is oppressive to women?

  • Meghan Murphy

    I mean that rape is a common theme in porn and that real rapes are made into porn. Beyond that, rape culture and porn culture are completely interconnected, as Sam discusses in the article.

  • Moderight

    These aren’t meant to be negative, but I want to ask these questions:
    1) What exactly would define a “good guy?”
    2) Isn’t the first thing anyone notices about someone else how they look? I’m not sure I understand the issue (boy to girl or girl to boy). I mean, I’m not going to notice how smart or down-to-earth someone is without spending time talking to them, so aren’t visual cues about people commonly first?

  • asialita

    “I cannot reply on feministcurrent as I’ve been unjustly blocked there.
    By “curfew” I was referring to the feminist current article that says
    men have proven that no man can ever be trusted & should be put
    under a curfew. Imagine if someone said the same thing about “black
    people” instead of “men”. What would your stance be then?”

    Men are included in the group “black people”. It wouldn’t make sense
    to put black women, who suffer from male violence also and do not
    commit crimes at the same rate as men in general (not to mention they’re not sexually harassing, catcalling, stalking, beating/killing women for rejecting their advances, and groping other women in public and on public transport), under a curfew like proposed in the article. And again, I stated that I don’t agree with placing men under a curfew, but I do see how some areas feel the need to segregate the sexes on public transport. I figured the Feminist Current article was the one you were referring to, which I am pretty sure was meant as a tongue-in-cheek response (Meghan can correct me if I’m wrong) to all the ridiculous suggestions that were given to women to avoid being harassed and sexually assaulted. Let’s take a look at
    some examples of things that were said to women:
    ——————————————

    After a series of assaults on campus at UBC, “the general public” (let’s call them “women,” why don’t we) were warned to “remain extra vigilant of their surroundings and take every precaution to enhance their personal safety” when walking alone at night or, alternatively, have a campus escort accompany them to their destination.

    Similarly, after the attacks in Germany, the Mayor of Cologne, Henriette Reker, suggested keeping “a certain distance of more than an arm’s length” from unknown men and told women that, “they should go out and have fun, but they need to be better prepared, especially with the Cologne carnival coming up.” She went on to say that there will be “online guidelines that these young women can read through to prepare themselves.”
    —————————————————————

    Why don’t those statements offend men? They are saying the same thing: that men can’t be trusted and thus women need to be on guard around them all the time. And Meghan was responding to such statements with, “Well, if we’re concluding that men are incapable of behaving themselves around women, then maybe we shouldn’t be curtailing women’s freedom, but instead curtail the perpetrators’.” We all know that an actual curfew for men would never happen and that most people don’t want that, but everyone gets in an uproar when a woman suggests it even as a joke or unrealistic scenario in response to the way we are treated.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ec9f4bb3ed52427691f154d0708fc33a3b2c31f04103ab855a3761a1ad923e7f.jpg

  • Jill

    Anything Sam writes is true. I’m her biggest fan 🙂

  • Yisheng Qingwa

    HELL YEAH